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LIVING YOUR AFRICAN DREAM

Contact Mike Currie Adventures:


Email: mike@mikecurrieadventures.co.za


Mike Currie: +27 (0)83 780 4101

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- SPECIES - Wild Wingshooting Africa

Waterfowl

South Africa offers a wide variety of waterfowl, ranging from the fast a swift flying Red-Billed Teal to the massive Spur-winged goose. Geese are generally hunted in the early mornings...

Francolin

If you are a true upland bird hunter at heart, you will love what Africa has to offer!! Hunting behind well schooled English and German Shorthaired Pointers for any of the 9 species of…

Guinea Fowl

If there was ever a game bird that screamed Africa, it is most certainly the Helmeted Guineafowl!! A very weary and alert bird that far prefers to run that it does to fly, but with a bit of...

Pigeons

The Speckled or Rock Pigeon is known as a very challenging bird to shoot, and its reputation is well deserved!! Flying at impressive speeds, they are also very acrobatic and like to drop down...

Doves

For those of you that like to shoot, and shoot a lot, our Cape Turtle and Laughing doves can certainly provide you with an action packed day!! We may not be on the same levels of…

South Africa offers a wide variety of waterfowl, ranging from the fast a swift flying Red-Billed Teal to the massive Spur-winged goose.


Geese are generally hunted in the early mornings in harvested maize fields where they are coming out to feed. The Egyptian Goose makes up for the majority of the shooting, as they tend to decoy far more readily than their larger cousins, the Spur-winged goose.

We like to make use of traditional layout blinds where possible, and position these amongst our decoy spread.


The hour of "Duck 30" certainly holds true as impressive numbers of ducks come dropping into our decoy spreads just before dark. We are normally positioned in our pre built grass blinds by mid afternoon, when we wait for the sight of cupped wings coming in to land.


The two main species of duck we encounter are the Yellow-billed ducks and Red-billed Teal. The Yellow-billed ducks with the characteristic yellow beaks act, quack and behave very similar to a mallard. The fast flying Red-billed Teal generally appear earlier and in larger flights, and make for some very challenging shooting!!